Fresh Spearmint - 50g

Fresh Spearmint - 50g

Fresh spearmint in a generous amount.

Essential for making the Indian mint sauce, tabbouleh and decorating your fruit salad! Or add to your naughty non-alcoholic cocktails with Australian Lyre'e non-alcoholic liquor collection! 

Dr. Mark Hyman raves about rosemary:

"A refreshing and energizing herb in its own right, spearmint often takes a backseat to its more boisterous relative, peppermint. But many people find they enjoy the more subtle flavor notes of this member of the mint family, which of course comes with some amazing health benefits. Spearmint was found to improve working memory in both men and women with age-related memory decline, and a recent randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial found that it also benefits young, healthy people through enhanced cognition such as increased focus and attention. Use spearmint for a morning pick-me-up in my Spicy Cucumber Mint Smoothie."

Why Should You Eat More Herbs and Spices?

Herbs have been used since ancient times for their medicinal properties, mostly concentrated into teas and tinctures. More recently, their healthful value as a food ingredient has been realized. For one, herbs add a burst of flavor to food, allowing you to cut back on salt without sacrificing taste. And several herbs, including parsley, have significant amounts of the essential vitamins A, C and K.

But the true power of herbs lies in their wealth of protective polyphenols — plant compounds with potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Piles of studies show that polyphenols in herbs help combat such diseases as cancer, heart disease, Alzheimer’s, diabetes and more. Polyphenols are anti-microbial, so they can help protect us from harmful bacteria as well. Although many of the studies on herbs’ effects have involved concentrated solutions of the leaves’ active components, there is evidence that their benefits still apply when they are cooked and eaten as part of a regular meal, too.

        Nutritional Information 
         
        While not typically consumed in large quantities, mint does contain a fair amount of nutrients.
        In fact, just under 1/3 cup or half an ounce (14 grams) of spearmint contains:

        Calories: 6
        Fiber: 1 gram
        Vitamin A: 12% of the RDI
        Iron: 9% of the RDI
        Manganese: 8% of the RDI
        Folate: 4% of the RDI
        Because of its dynamic flavor, mint is often added to recipes in small amounts, so consuming even 1/3 cup may be difficult. However, it’s possible you may come close to this amount in some salad recipes that include mint among the other ingredients.

        Mint is a particularly good source of vitamin A, a fat-soluble vitamin that is critical for eye health and night vision.

        It is also a potent source of antioxidants, especially when compared to other herbs and spices. Antioxidants help protect your body from oxidative stress, a type of damage to cells caused by free radicals.

        Credit: healthline.com

        Recipe: Non-Alcohol Cucumber Mint Gin and Low Sugar Tonic

        Ingredients:


        6 thin slices cucumber
        6 fresh mint leaves
        ¼ lime
        Steps: 

        1. Fill a glass half full with ice. Pound the cucumber and mint leaves in a mortar and pop over the ice into the glass. Squeeze the lime over the ice and toss that in as well. Pour in the non-alcohol gin, and then the tonic, and give a quick stir. Serve it up.

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          Fresh spearmint in a generous amount.

          Essential for making the Indian mint sauce, tabbouleh and decorating your fruit salad! Or add to your naughty non-alcoholic cocktails with Australian Lyre'e non-alcoholic liquor collection! 

          Dr. Mark Hyman raves about rosemary:

          "A refreshing and energizing herb in its own right, spearmint often takes a backseat to its more boisterous relative, peppermint. But many people find they enjoy the more subtle flavor notes of this member of the mint family, which of course comes with some amazing health benefits. Spearmint was found to improve working memory in both men and women with age-related memory decline, and a recent randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial found that it also benefits young, healthy people through enhanced cognition such as increased focus and attention. Use spearmint for a morning pick-me-up in my Spicy Cucumber Mint Smoothie."

          Why Should You Eat More Herbs and Spices?

          Herbs have been used since ancient times for their medicinal properties, mostly concentrated into teas and tinctures. More recently, their healthful value as a food ingredient has been realized. For one, herbs add a burst of flavor to food, allowing you to cut back on salt without sacrificing taste. And several herbs, including parsley, have significant amounts of the essential vitamins A, C and K.

          But the true power of herbs lies in their wealth of protective polyphenols — plant compounds with potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Piles of studies show that polyphenols in herbs help combat such diseases as cancer, heart disease, Alzheimer’s, diabetes and more. Polyphenols are anti-microbial, so they can help protect us from harmful bacteria as well. Although many of the studies on herbs’ effects have involved concentrated solutions of the leaves’ active components, there is evidence that their benefits still apply when they are cooked and eaten as part of a regular meal, too.

                Nutritional Information 
                 
                While not typically consumed in large quantities, mint does contain a fair amount of nutrients.
                In fact, just under 1/3 cup or half an ounce (14 grams) of spearmint contains:

                Calories: 6
                Fiber: 1 gram
                Vitamin A: 12% of the RDI
                Iron: 9% of the RDI
                Manganese: 8% of the RDI
                Folate: 4% of the RDI
                Because of its dynamic flavor, mint is often added to recipes in small amounts, so consuming even 1/3 cup may be difficult. However, it’s possible you may come close to this amount in some salad recipes that include mint among the other ingredients.

                Mint is a particularly good source of vitamin A, a fat-soluble vitamin that is critical for eye health and night vision.

                It is also a potent source of antioxidants, especially when compared to other herbs and spices. Antioxidants help protect your body from oxidative stress, a type of damage to cells caused by free radicals.

                Credit: healthline.com

                Recipe: Non-Alcohol Cucumber Mint Gin and Low Sugar Tonic

                Ingredients:


                6 thin slices cucumber
                6 fresh mint leaves
                ¼ lime
                Steps: 

                1. Fill a glass half full with ice. Pound the cucumber and mint leaves in a mortar and pop over the ice into the glass. Squeeze the lime over the ice and toss that in as well. Pour in the non-alcohol gin, and then the tonic, and give a quick stir. Serve it up.
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