Fresh Thyme - 50g

Fresh Thyme - 50g

Fresh thyme in a generous amount.

Not only good to cook your chicken and potatoes with but also you can make flavored oils and vinegar with thyme. Add into soups for extra comfort from its pleasant scent.

Dr. Mark Hyman raves about thyme:

"Thyme: This is one of the herbs that just tastes like the holidays, due to its frequent appearance in roasted turkey. Thyme contains an active compound called carvacrol, which can inhibit the inflammatory COX-2 enzyme, in a similar way to the resveratrol found in red wine. But by choosing thyme you can avoid the negative associations of alcohol while still reaping those anti-inflammatory benefits. Thyme also contains antibacterial, antifungal, and anti-cancer properties. Check out my Roasted Garlic and Tahini Spread recipe (towards the bottom of the page) for a unique way to use thyme."

Why Should You Eat More Herbs and Spices?

Herbs have been used since ancient times for their medicinal properties, mostly concentrated into teas and tinctures. More recently, their healthful value as a food ingredient has been realized. For one, herbs add a burst of flavor to food, allowing you to cut back on salt without sacrificing taste. And several herbs, including parsley, have significant amounts of the essential vitamins A, C and K.

But the true power of herbs lies in their wealth of protective polyphenols — plant compounds with potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Piles of studies show that polyphenols in herbs help combat such diseases as cancer, heart disease, Alzheimer’s, diabetes and more. Polyphenols are anti-microbial, so they can help protect us from harmful bacteria as well. Although many of the studies on herbs’ effects have involved concentrated solutions of the leaves’ active components, there is evidence that their benefits still apply when they are cooked and eaten as part of a regular meal, too.


            Nutritional Information 

            Getting all the vitamins your body needs every day can be challenging.
            Luckily, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reports that thyme is packed with helpful nutrients, including:

            - Vitamin A
            - Vitamin C
            - Copper
            - Fiber
            - Iron
            - Manganese

            However, thyme isn’t a great source of these nutrients unless you consume it in excessive quantities. For example, 1 teaspoon of thyme has 1.28 milligrams of vitamin C — according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), that’s only 1 percent of your daily needs.

            Credit: healthline.com

            Try This At Home: LEMON AND THYME INFUSED SEA SALT

            Ingredients:

            zest from one organic lemon
            ½ cup, sea salt
            2 tsp fresh thyme

            Steps: 

            1. Combine all ingredients in a small bowl.
            2. Place the mixture on a baking mat and spread out thinly
            3. Bake at 100°C in an oven for 2 hours, mix the salt after one hour.
            4. Remove from oven and let cool
            5. Using the flat spatula, gently press out any lumps that have formed.
            6. Store in a tightly sealed glass jar
            7. To use, sprinkle onto your food to taste either before or after cooking. (great with seafood!)

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              Fresh thyme in a generous amount.

              Not only good to cook your chicken and potatoes with but also you can make flavored oils and vinegar with thyme. Add into soups for extra comfort from its pleasant scent.

              Dr. Mark Hyman raves about thyme:

              "Thyme: This is one of the herbs that just tastes like the holidays, due to its frequent appearance in roasted turkey. Thyme contains an active compound called carvacrol, which can inhibit the inflammatory COX-2 enzyme, in a similar way to the resveratrol found in red wine. But by choosing thyme you can avoid the negative associations of alcohol while still reaping those anti-inflammatory benefits. Thyme also contains antibacterial, antifungal, and anti-cancer properties. Check out my Roasted Garlic and Tahini Spread recipe (towards the bottom of the page) for a unique way to use thyme."

              Why Should You Eat More Herbs and Spices?

              Herbs have been used since ancient times for their medicinal properties, mostly concentrated into teas and tinctures. More recently, their healthful value as a food ingredient has been realized. For one, herbs add a burst of flavor to food, allowing you to cut back on salt without sacrificing taste. And several herbs, including parsley, have significant amounts of the essential vitamins A, C and K.

              But the true power of herbs lies in their wealth of protective polyphenols — plant compounds with potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Piles of studies show that polyphenols in herbs help combat such diseases as cancer, heart disease, Alzheimer’s, diabetes and more. Polyphenols are anti-microbial, so they can help protect us from harmful bacteria as well. Although many of the studies on herbs’ effects have involved concentrated solutions of the leaves’ active components, there is evidence that their benefits still apply when they are cooked and eaten as part of a regular meal, too.


                        Nutritional Information 

                        Getting all the vitamins your body needs every day can be challenging.
                        Luckily, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reports that thyme is packed with helpful nutrients, including:

                        - Vitamin A
                        - Vitamin C
                        - Copper
                        - Fiber
                        - Iron
                        - Manganese

                        However, thyme isn’t a great source of these nutrients unless you consume it in excessive quantities. For example, 1 teaspoon of thyme has 1.28 milligrams of vitamin C — according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), that’s only 1 percent of your daily needs.

                        Credit: healthline.com

                        Try This At Home: LEMON AND THYME INFUSED SEA SALT

                        Ingredients:

                        zest from one organic lemon
                        ½ cup, sea salt
                        2 tsp fresh thyme

                        Steps: 

                        1. Combine all ingredients in a small bowl.
                        2. Place the mixture on a baking mat and spread out thinly
                        3. Bake at 100°C in an oven for 2 hours, mix the salt after one hour.
                        4. Remove from oven and let cool
                        5. Using the flat spatula, gently press out any lumps that have formed.
                        6. Store in a tightly sealed glass jar
                        7. To use, sprinkle onto your food to taste either before or after cooking. (great with seafood!)
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